Tag Archives: Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece (3 v.)–Choice (May, 2007)

Ancient Greece: v.1: Achaean League-Dorian invasion of Greece [DRAFT]
44-4799                                                                                DF214                                                                                           2006-16525 CIP

Ancient Greece: v.1: Achaean League-Dorian invasion of Greece, 1-338; v.2: Draco-Posidonius, 339-684; v.3: Praxiteles-Zeuxis of Heraclea; Appendixes; Indexes, 685-1031, ed. by Thomas J. Sienkewicz.  Salem Press, 2007.  3v bibl indexes afp ISBN 1-58765-281-1, $207.00; ISBN 9781587652813, $207.00.

According to the publisher’s note, “By design, Magill’s Choice reference sets compile and update previously published material from Salem Press.” The set brings together 29 new essays and 315 essays from: Great Events from History: the Ancient World, Prehistory-476 C.E. (2004), Great Lives from History: the Ancient World, Prehistory-476 C.E. (2004), Cyclopedia of World Authors (4th rev. ed., 2004), Encyclopedia of the Ancient World (2002), Weapons and Warfare (2002), and Magill’s Guide to Military History (2001). Each entry’s bibliography has been updated. A complete list of contents is reprinted in all volumes as well as three maps of Greece and the Near East. Entries provide phonetic pronunciations for Greek words. Biographical entries are broken into dates, category of activity, life and influence with see also references to other entries in the set. The homoeroticism of Sappho’s poetry is discussed, but overall the topics of gender and sexuality are underrepresented. There are no index terms for homosexuality, lesbianism or sex. Women’s contributions are discussed in the “Women’s Lives” entry. The third volume contains: a glossary of terms; list of historic sites with URLs; literary works by author; time line; a bibliography of secondary sources; and indices by category, name and subject. For general through undergraduate. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and general readers. — M. W. Handis, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

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Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece–Choice (April, 2006)

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece [DRAFT]

551713                                                            DF16                                                   2005-4434

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece, ed. By Nigel Wilson. Routledge, 2006. 800p bibl index afp ISBN 0415973341, $150.00

Based on The Encyclopedia of Greece and the Hellenic Tradition, edited by Graham Speake (reviewed in CHOICE jun 2001), which sought to cover the history of Greece from ancient times up to the present, “This new version results from the realization that there is also a place for a shorter work covering the same wide range of themes but concentrating on the ancient or classical world.” It seeks not only to focus on the traditional “classical” Greek period (Homer through Alexander the Great) but also through the fourth century A.D. The work contains lists of alphabetical entries, thematic entries and a chronology of individuals as well as an extensive index. Greek name forms that entered English from Latin have been retained with some exceptions, and 565 A.D. (Justinian I’s death) marks the direct transliteration from Greek into English. There are no illustrations or maps. Each entry has its own bibliography. For persons, a brief biography is given at the end of the entry followed by the bibliography and, in the case of authors, a list of writings. Entries from the original Speakes edition have been reprinted; in some cases, entries have been abbreviated and names changed, e.g. Corcyra for Corfu. Greek deities do not have their own entries; information on them can be found under “Gods and Goddesses” and “Religious History,” although the easiest way to find information would be to use the index. Only two women have their own entries, Cleopatra VII and Sappho. The list of contributors and advisors is impressive, with many well-known researchers in the field. For public and academic libraries.—Michael W. Handis, The Graduate Center, City University of New York.

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