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Toby Wilkinson, The Thames and Hudson Dictionary of Ancient Egypt–Choice (February, 2006)

Toby Wilkinson, The Thames & Hudson Dictionary of Ancient Egypt [DRAFT]

54-9871                                                           DT58                                       LC Classification

Wilkinson, Toby. The Thames & Hudson Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson, 2005. 271p bibl ISBN 0500051372; 9780500051375, $50.00

Lavishly illustrated, many in color, and maps of the temple complexes, the Nile and its delta. According to the preface, this book seeks “to be the most comprehensive, single-volume dictionary of ancient Egypt currently available in the English language.” The bibliography (p. 270-271) is broken up into subjects: general; art, architecture and monuments; history; individual rulers and periods; language, literature & writing; and religion. The dictionary covers Egypt up to the Macedonian conquest in 332 B.C. Entries are alphabetical and listed under the transliterated spellings of Egyptian names with cross-references from the more familiar forms, e.g. Khufu for Cheops. It incorporates the most recent scholarship, such as the CT scan of Tutankhamun’s mummy that showed no blunt trauma to the head, thereby discrediting the theory that the king had been murdered. One discrepency is Nefertiti. Scholars, Wilkinson writes, now believe that Nefertiti may have ruled under the name Neferneferuaten after her husband Akhenaten’s death. There is no entry under Neferneferuaten. The entry for Smenkhkara, Akhenaten’s successor, was assumed to be an older brother of Tutankhamun but now recent scholarships suggests that Smenkhkara was really Nefertiti. There is no cross-reference from Nefertiti to Smenkhkara. Overall, an excellent general reference for public and college libraries.—Michael W. Handis, The Graduate Center, City University of New York.

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